Archbishop Gallagher at IAEA: A world without nuclear weapons is possible

IAEA ensures timely access to radiation therapy and nuclear medicine for cancer in low- and middle-income countries

Mary Teresa: The Vatican

While expressing his opposition to the use of nuclear weapons, a world without nuclear weapons is possible, Archbishop Paul Richard Gallagher, Secretary of the Department of International Relations, told the 66th General Assembly of the International Atomic Energy Agency.

Addressing the 66th General Assembly of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) held in Vienna on September 26, on the World Day for the Abolition of Nuclear Weapons, Archbishop Gallagher first conveyed the good wishes of Pope Francis to those attending the assembly.

Archbishop Gallagher expressed the gratitude of the IAEA for the work done by the IAEA to improve human life, including the eradication of cancer.

Amidst the terrible armed conflicts and tensions taking place in many parts of the world, and the ever-escalating war in Ukraine, there is little room to find solutions through embassies, but we must never give up on dialogue, Archbishop Gallagher said.

A world without nuclear weapons

Archbishop Kalakar has said that the Holy See calls on all countries to abandon all weapons and through tireless discussion and negotiations, to eliminate the causes of war, and said that the Holy See firmly believes that a world without nuclear weapons is necessary and possible.

For the same purpose, Tirupedam has signed the Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons and has been implementing it, Archbishop Kalakar has pointed out the ecological, social, economic, ethical and political crises caused by climate change and pandemic.

Assistance from the IAEA

Archbishop Gallagher said that the Holy See has praised the IAEA for supporting countries in using nuclear science and nuclear technology to monitor environmental pollution, developing cancer control strategies in low- and middle-income countries, and ensuring timely access to radiation therapy and nuclear drugs for the disease. .

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