Children from poor families live shorter and are less healthy

Children from underprivileged families in our country live on average fifteen years shorter in good health. According to Professor Gera Nagelhout, who grew up in a family with a lower socio-economic position, the government should do more to prevent poverty and promote health. Maastricht University reports this.

In an article for Algemeen Dagblad, Nagelhout argues that the government should do more to help people with a low income. “The high costs of energy and groceries cause a lot of money stress in people who already had little to spend. Long-term stress not only has direct health consequences, such as an increased risk of cardiovascular disease, sleeping problems and anxiety disorders. It also makes people less able to plan and look further ahead, which makes it difficult to both live healthy and manage money problems.” People with lower incomes should be compensated for the high inflation, says Nagelhout. “We must prevent people from falling into poverty. The consequences are serious.”

Financial stress

Nagelhout herself comes from a family of, as she would describe in her own jargon, “lower socio-economic status”. Families like hers often live unhealthy lives, and their children adopt those habits. “Baking a big bag of chips is easier and cheaper than putting boiled potatoes with vegetables and fish on the table,” Nagelhout summarizes. “Starting a healthier life isn’t easy for everyone. But it’s even harder for families with financial stress. Their main concern is survival. If you’re constantly worrying about how you’re going to make it through the month without moving further To put in debt, tobacco and alcohol can sometimes provide some relief. In such circumstances, you just have to try to quit an addiction or find the energy to exercise.” People with a low education or a low income therefore, on average, are confronted with ailments and diseases such as diabetes and cardiovascular diseases at a much younger age.

By: National Education Guide

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