Japan registered four dead and more than a hundred injured by typhoon Nanmadol

More than 140,000 houses are still without electricity. The island of Kyushu, one of the three largest in the country, was the hardest hit.

Japan recorded at least four dead and more than a hundred wounded after the arrival of typhoon Nanmadol during this last weekend.

The powerful storm made landfall last Sunday night in the southwestern city of Kagoshima and dumped heavy rain on the Kyushu region, before moving down the west coast of the archipelago.

the typhoon uprooted trees, smashed windows and caused heavy rainfall in Miyazaki prefecture, where two fatalities were confirmed. In addition, two other people were found “without signs of life”, according to the government spokesman, Hirozaku Matsuno.

In parallel, at least 114 people were injured as a result of the natural phenomenon, while 14 of them are hospitalized in serious condition.



The aftermath of the Nanmadol tigon in Kunitomi, on the island of Kyushu, Japan. Reuters photo.

The authorities remain vigilant, since the balance of victims can worsen. Tuesday morningthe storm was downgraded to an extratropical cyclonewhile crossing to the east coast to leave the country again.

Some 140,000 houses remain without power, most of them on Kyushu, the country’s third-largest island.

Last Saturday, the Japan Meteorological Agency (JMA) issued a special warning before the arrival of the powerful typhoon Nanmadol, qualified as a storm, on the island of Kyushu (southwest).without precedentsin the archipelago.




A “never seen before” typhoon in southwestern Japan. AFP photo.

It was the first time that the JMA activated an alert of this type for one of the four main islands. The agency’s director of forecasts, Ryuta Kurora, called it a typhoon. “dangerous as never seen before.”

Meanwhile, the national television network NHK indicated that there were evacuation instructions for the almost two million inhabitants of the region.

Before the arrival of the typhoon, flights were canceled at regional airports, especially those in Kagoshima, Miyazaki and Kumamoto, according to websites of Japan Airlines y All Nippon Airways.

This handout photo taken and released on September 17, 2022 by the Japan Meteorological Agency shows satellite images showing Typhoon Nanmadol located near the remote islands of southern Japan.


This handout photo taken and released on September 17, 2022 by the Japan Meteorological Agency shows satellite images showing Typhoon Nanmadol located near the remote islands of southern Japan.

In addition, rail service operators and supermarkets announced the total or partial suspension of their services.

In 2019, Typhoon Hagibis hit Japan, which hosted the rugby world cup, claiming the lives of more than 100 people. A year before, Typhoon Jebi caused the closure of the Kansai airport in Osaka, and caused 14 fatalities.

Meanwhile, in 2018 floods and landslides left 200 dead in the west of the country during the rainy season.

The typhoon delayed the arrival of the Japanese prime minister at the UN

Japanese Prime Minister Fumio Kishida left for New York on Tuesday to participate in the UN General Assembly, one day later than expected to assess the damage caused by the passage of strong typhoon Nanmadol through Japan.

Fumio Kishida, Prime Minister of Japan.  Photo: AFP.


Fumio Kishida, Prime Minister of Japan. Photo: AFP.

Kishida will give a speech before members of the body, in which he is expected to call for respect for international law and mention China’s growing military assertiveness.

“At a time when the foundations of the international order are being shaken by the Russian aggression in Ukraine and other developments, I will forcefully present Japan’s ideas, including on strengthening the functions of the UN,” he said before leaving. to the American city.

With information from agencies.

ES​

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