What if it was Kate, rather than Meghan, the real revolutionary? If asked the Sunday Times today. And thinking back to the latest images of the Duchess of Cambridge, loose hair, little makeup and a trench coat to blend in with the crowd that a week ago, after Meghan’s explosive interview on American TV, paid tribute to the place where she was seen for the last time Sarah Everard, the young London professional found lifeless, the question was already answered.

Safety

For Kate, that gesture which, among other things, precisely because it is not very organized by the protocol, born of instinct without too much warning also for security, then unleashed a small storm on Kate (if she did not break the lockdown rules, among other things presenting himself without a mask), was a way of expressing his closeness to the human drama of the girl’s family. But above all to say how much the wife of the heir to the throne (after Charles) understands the urgency of security for girls, for women, in the streets of London. Remembering the years when she too went out in the evening, with the anxiety of security, as Kensington Palace said. And from the Cambridge residence in fact arrived the daffodils brought by Kate to that corner of Clapham Common in South London, which has become the place of memory of the young Sarah.

Policy

A political gesture, which projected it into an institutional dimension. Now no longer the Kate, Cinderella, of 10 years ago round when she married Prince Charming William, but part of the institution. That institution from which Meghan instead took a clear step back.

Quiet revolution

But not only the choice to mix with the people, in the name of all the girls who go out in the evening are afraid for their safety, to say how much Kate really is the Windsor revolutionary. Its for a quiet, progressive, thoughtful revolution. Exactly what the monarchies need to continue over the centuries. Without losing contact with reality, but at the same time without losing that historical and magical aura.

Future

So at least two big projects in the last year have made us understand the real Kate – behind the Kate Royal Mum and behind Kate Commoner with the dream of marrying a prince: Hold Still, the photo contest that became a book – with her beautiful and spontaneous portrait taken by Matt Porteous – to deliver to posterity the images of the United Kingdom locked in the lockdown. And the big questionnaire for the whole country on the needs of children under the age of 5: a way to imagine the best actions to avert a life of social problems and unhappiness for them. Enough to prove that even without the Che hat, with which the Times put her on the page, Kate has the makings of a revolutionary.

April 4, 2021 (change April 4, 2021 | 21:25)

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